See You Tomorrow Charles

Charles is the new boy in first grade and he is blind. His classmates want to be helpful. Should they protect Charles or treat him like everyone else? Through events that take place the answer is found.

Seeing Things My Way

Because of a brain tumor, Amanda cannot see very well, but because she has friends with similar problems, the help of special equipment and teachers, and a very full schedule, she forgets to feel sorry for herself. Ages 6-9

Spectacles

Book Cover, Spectacles

A little girl that is nearsighted, tells some of the unusual things she saw before being fitted with glasses. An amusing story that shows how much better things look when you can see them clearly.

T.J.’S Story

A nine-year-old boy who has been blind from birth describes various aspects of his life, including his reading in Braille, his use of a cane, and the games he plays with his friends. Ages 6-9

Taking Visual Impairment To School

Lisa, who was born blind, talks about how she reads with Braille, moves around town, gets dressed faster than her older sister, and even plays baseball at camp (with ball that beeps!) (ages 5-10)

Ten Thank-You Letters

This is a Text and Braille book. Pig is writing a thank-you note to his grandma when his friend Rabbit comes over to play. Eager to get in on the action, Rabbit writes one of his own . . . and another . . . and another . . . until his flurry of thank-you… More Ten Thank-You Letters

The Black Book Of Colors

Living with the use of one’s eyes can make imagining blindness difficult, but this innovative title invites readers to imagine living without sight through remarkable illustrations done with raised lines and descriptions of colors based on imagery. Braille letters accompany the illustrations and a full Braille alphabet offers sighted readers help reading along with their… More The Black Book Of Colors

The Night Search

Heather, who is blind, resists using her white cane until she tries to find her puppy outdoors at night, and experience that helps her accept her cane as a valuable helper

The Patch

The kids at school want to know why Becca is wearing glasses and a patch. Instead of telling them she has amblyopia, Becca leads her friends on imaginative adventures to explain her new fashion accessory.

The Pirate of Kindergarten

Book Cover, The Pirate of Kindergarten

Doubles are good for lots of things – double scoops of ice cream, double features at the movies. But double vision is NOT a good kind of double. In fact, it can make kindergarten kind of hard. Ginny sees double chairs at reading circle and double words in her books. The solution to her problem… More The Pirate of Kindergarten

The Secret Code

Book Cover, The Secret Code

Simple story about two young children, each reading in their own way. Lucy uses print, Oscar uses Braille.

Thinking Big and Mine For A Year

Two stories in one book. “Thinking Big” is important to eight-year-old Jaime Osborn. Jaime has dwarfism. Her body will grow to average size, but her limbs will always be short. Jaime is one of the Little People of America. In ‘Mine for a Year” Doug the black Labrador is just a pup when he comes… More Thinking Big and Mine For A Year

We Can Do It! (Nosotros si Podemos Hacerlo!)

Colorful photos and simple text show individual children, one with Spina Bifida, two with Cerebral Palsy, one with Down Syndrome and one who is blind- at home, school and play. Very positive. Wonderful book for classrooms. Available in English and in Spanish. Ages 3 and up.

Whitney’s New Glasses

Whitney is afraid to start wearing his new glasses. By the end of the story he realizes that there is something about every person that makes him or her special. Suggestions for follow-up activities included.

Why Do I Have To Wear Glasses?

Book Cover, Why Do I Have To Wear Glasses?

Emphasizes that glasses are not a punishment, but an ingenious solution to a very common problem. Funny and informative; explains in clear, honest terms what eye problems are and how they are corrected. Also provides a humorous history of eyeglasses.